Technology Is A License To Forget

Thought provoking. Reminded me about the food industry (ie, meat, in particular). I give no thought to how much an animal suffered so that I could be served veal on a platter.

L.M. Sacasas

“It is at this point [when the power of technology becomes evident] that a pervasive ignorance and refusal to know, irresponsibility, and blind faith characterize society’s orientation toward the technical. Here it happens that men release powerful changes into the world with cavalier disregard for consequences; that they begin to ‘use’ apparatus, technique, and organization with no attention to the ways in which these ‘tools’ unexpectedly rearrange their lives; that they willingly submit the governance of their affairs to the expertise of others. It is here also that they begin to participate without second thought in megatechnical systems far beyond their comprehension or control; that they endlessly proliferate technological forms of life that isolate people from each other and cripple rather than enrich the human potential; that they stand idly by while vast technical systems reverse the reasonable relationship between means and ends. It is here above all that modern…

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‘Secret’ iPhone App Is Silicon Valley’s Newest Obsession

Shhhh….

Tech

On the Internet, there are several kinds of communities. There are the ones where everybody goes by real identities — in theory, at least — such as Facebook. There are ones where you can choose to participate using either your real identity or a manufactured one, such as Twitter.

And then there are communities where anonymity is kind of the whole point. Such as Secret, a new iPhone app which debuted just last week. At the moment, it seems, half of Silicon Valley is fixated on it — though it’s hard to say just who, since it’s a community with no names, profiles or photographs.

The overarching purpose of Secret, say its creators, “is to not build only an app, but a platform that will bring more authenticity, self-awareness and empathy to the world.” People, in other words, are more likely to speak their mind in an…

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Dyson DC59 Review: A Portable Powerhouse To Help You Ditch Corded Vacuums Entirely

A good option for people that have diminished strength or are working from a wheelchair. Universal design!

Chromebox: Here Come Google’s Desktop Computers

Tech

Google is attacking the desktop PC with renewed purpose, announcing a wave of new Chromeboxes and a suite of meeting tools for businesses.

Unless you’re running an IT department, the most interesting Chromebox will be the $179 model from Asus. It has an Intel Celeron processor, 2 GB of RAM, 16 GB of storage, four USB ports and an SD card slot, along with an HDMI output for connecting to an external monitor. Essentially, it’s a low-end Chromebook minus the screen and keyboard.

While this isn’t the first attempt at putting Chrome OS on a desktop PC, Asus’ Chromebox is far cheaper than the $329 Samsung model that preceded it. The price alone makes it interesting if you’re in need of a secondary desktop computer but, as always, the browser-based operating system can be limiting. For a primary PC you’re probably better off with a Mac or Windows-based machine…

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Where Technology, Culture, Disabilities, & Abilities Intersect

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